5 solutions to outrageous seller expectations

Mar 12, 2018 | News, Newsletter content

Sellers need to understand clearly the impact of unattractive features on the asking price for their property.

All estate agents can share experiences on dealing with outrageous seller expectations. Australian Chris Wilkins recently shared on Inman Connect five of the oddest situations he had to resolve with sellers.

Put away the toys

Some sellers prioritise their children’s happiness above making their property attractive to prospective buyers. Chris had such a couple who didn’t take kindly to his suggestion that they tidy up the toys lying about in their tiny outdoor space. He turned around their thinking by pointing out their target audience, young couples and downsizers, would both most likely be put off by the clutter.

Be prepared with the facts

Sellers with property with unattractive features such as adjacent busy roads sometimes expect prospective buyers to ‘just get used to it’. Chris responded to this by showing the seller examples of properties he had recently sold near busy roads and how that affected the selling price. Sellers need to understand clearly the impact of unattractive features on the asking price for their property.

Spick and span

Most sellers know their property needs to the spotless before being shown to prospective buyers, but there are those that just say they are just to busy to wash the dishes or make the beds. Sellers must be clear on their responsibility to make their home as attractive as possible to buyers, if they are too busy to clean, then they should hire a professional cleaner as soon as the property hits the market.

Know the market

Sellers often have fixed ideas on what their property is worth and could be unwilling for anything less. Chris found the best solution is to come prepared to these clients with comparable sales from the same area for the past six months. This gives sellers factual guidance towards determining a realistic asking price.

No prying eyes

It can require special tact to convince sellers it is better for them not to be present when prospective buyers are brought to their house. Chris explains that buyers prefer to do what they need to without being under the watchful eye of the seller. Sellers are encouraged not to anything that could deter the buyer.

(Chris Wilkins is the director at Ray White Drummoyne in Sydney, Australia.)

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